Optimize battery life on Ubuntu

I see a lot of people asking for tips to optimize battery life on Ubuntu. Indeed I noticed that XPS 13 battery life was curiously not as good as under Windows 10.

Here are few tips that will considerably optimize battery life on Ubuntu.

Those tips have been tested on a Dell XPS 13 9343 (2015) but will work all the same on most  laptop.

Install TLP, an advanced power management tool

TLP (as of today I still have not find what the TLP acronym stand for) is a tool that automatically apply various tweaks and settings on your laptop to save battery power.

TLP is a command line application. There is no graphical interface and it is launched automatically at Ubuntu start. It is completely hidden to the end-user.

To install TPL, open a terminal and run the following commands :

 

Note : If you have a Thinkpad you need a few more packages, simply run :

 

That’s it! TLP will automatically start at the next reboot.

For me the default setting works great. If you want to edit the configurations by yourself take a look at the documentation. It explains in details all the possible changes.

Disable Bluetooth at startup

I barely use Bluetooth. Turning it off at startup will save a bit of juice.

Using TLP

You can turn Bluetooth off at startup using the TLP application we just installed. Open TLP config file :

And simply add the following line to the configuration file :

DEVICES_TO_DISABLE_ON_STARTUP=“bluetooth”

Using Rc.local

If you do not have a laptop or you don’t want to install TLP simply edit your rc.local file :

Add the following before the line with exit 0 :
rfkill block bluetooth

 


I hope this will help you. If you are still not satisfied of your battery life you can try to use power-top to troubleshoot applications / parts of your computer that consume a lot of power.

 

  • Franco

    Should I always run “sudo tlp start” when I turn on my computer or does tlp run by default?

    • hg8

      Hi Franco. No need to run this command again. TLP will automatically start.